Tuesday, 1 February 2011

Which book...

a) would you rescue first in a fire?
b) was your ‘first love’?
c) didn’t live up to your expectations?
d) do you wish you’d written?
e) would you want to be the last you ever read?

10 comments:

Runny Thinker said...

a) very possibly (and very sadly) the nearest Wisden. More stories in there than in any novel...
b) Difficult to sort out the jumble of youthful memories, but maybe an Asterix? After that, Laura Ingalls Wilder springs to mind, for some reason.
c) Beano annual 1974. Somehow didn't live up to the high standards of its predecessor.
d) Hithchiker's Guide To The Galaxy. Dammit, the man stole all my ideas. Never mind that I had them 20 years later...
e) don't know. Haven't read it yet

Yes I know. Cop out answers.

(by the way, The Method arrived safely - much anticipated. Thanks!)

Kay Sexton said...

Too difficult - would I save the rarest one or the most loved? The one an ex-lover scribbled marginalia in but which, as a text, leaves me lukewarm, or the one that I go to again and again for wisdom?

First Love - Martin Pippin in the Apple Orchard, Eleanor Farjeon
Failed Expectations - anything by Milan Kundera
Wish I'd written - The Storyteller, Mario Vargas Llosa
Would wish to be the last I read - anything published in 2078 ....

TOM J VOWLER said...

Ha, RT. Loving those answers, esp a).

And, Kay, tis difficult isn't it. Good last answer :)

Vanessa Gebbie said...

a) A little-known novel entitled ‘Joe’. One copy only in existence. Written in blue biro on a school exercise book, by one Vanessa Rees, aged 14. I am not known for writing romances, and this is no exception – each chapter ends with Joe in a clinch with some female, doing ‘what God bade him...’ (I had no idea what people actually did...)


b) ‘The House of Sixty Fathers’ by Meindert DeJong, illustrated by Maurice Sendak. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_House_of_Sixty_Fathers
I read this when I was about 6 – 7. (That’s 6 or seven, not 67, which I have not reached yet).

c) Too many to list.

d) Austerlitz, by W G Sebald. Review here, years after its publication, ib Telegraph. With plot spoilers... http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/columnists/anwilson/3563730/Austerlitz-by-W.G.-Sebald-moved-me-as-much-as-few-novels-have-done.html

e) Unable to answer. Question assumes I have already read it and would select to re-read from choice over all others... and I haven’t finished reading/living yet. However, if the question actually means, ‘Which book would I select to read if I knew I was to die’ – then that book would be ‘Evidence of the Afterlife’ by Long and Perry – or some such. http://www.amazon.com/Evidence-Afterlife-Science-Near-Death-Experiences/dp/0061452556

TOM J VOWLER said...

Thanks, V. Off to read that review now. And must get a hold of a) sometime ;)

Lyndsay Wheble said...

a) The To Kill a Mockingbird I used for GCSE - my comments in the margin really make me laugh now and remind me of a moment way back when...

b) Jane Austen's Emma. I think I may have related to it a tad.

c) Anything by Balzac, or Moby Dick, which I have never been able to finish.

d) Atonement.

e) Hopefully I've got a few years yet; let's see what comes out between now and then...

By the way, I've just done a re-jig of my blog and 'How to Write a Novel' is sat v happily on my blogroll; any chance, if you liked mine, you could add me to yours?

Also, where in SW are you? I'm originally from a town on the edge of Dartmoor...

Thanks,

Lyndsay Wheble

TOM J VOWLER said...

Hi Lyndsay

Atonement is my favourite McEwan - the one I find difficult to pick holes in.

I'm to the west, in Tavistock.

Will have a look at your blog and add you soonest.

Lyndsay Wheble said...

Umm, ok, this is weird; I'm from Tavistock...

My parents still live there...did you go to Tavistock College?

TOM J VOWLER said...

Nope, just been here a year, but love it.

Lyndsay Wheble said...

Nice. I don't know if you've been there but I once thought about setting a story in Creber's...didn't come off though :)